Growing Your Own Herbs

Growing Your Own Herbs

herb gardenGrowing your own herbs means having great flavor right at your finger tips, whenever you want it.

Years ago I discovered that I not only enjoyed gardening, but that it allowed me to have a lot of produce on hand that I would not frequently buy at the grocery store for a number of reasons. It seems that grocery store produce goes bad quickly, is already bad in the store or is just plain not good quality. This is especially true for fresh herbs.

Let’s use cilantro as an example. I buy cilantro at least once per month. It generally costs between $1.00 and $1.50 for a bunch. But, most of the time about half the bunch goes bad before I can use it all. I’m spending on average $12.00 – $18.00 per year and only using half of what I buy. So, this year I bought a cilantro plant for $2.00. This will provide me cilantro as I need it without the waste at a fraction of the cost. Actually, it is costing me 600% more to buy it at the store on annual basis.

What will I do in winter? Since I potted my herbs this year, I’ll just bring them inside. If they need more light, I’ll get a compact fluorescent grow light. This will ensure that I have herbs all year long.

How to Grow Your Own Herbs

If you’ve never grown your own herbs, I recommend starting small with just a few common herbs like basil, cilantro, oregano, rosemary or thyme. I highly recommend potting your herbs if you want them to stay around after fall comes. Many herbs can’t survive the cooling temperatures of all outside. But, at the end of the day this is a decision you’ll have to make.

Make sure your herbs are in good soil. If you’re potting, make sure your pot is large enough to accommodate the growing herbs and ensure that it has adequate drainage. Be sure to use potting soil and not garden soil. If using garden soil, add a good amount of perlite to the soil before planting your herbs. Once planted, water immediately.

Place your herbs in the appropriate amount of sunlight for the specific type and water according to directions. If you aren’t sure, refer to the link at the beginning of the post for a list of herbs and information.

What am I Growing This Year?

Cilantro
Cilantro

 

Pineapple Sage
Pineapple Sage

 

Purple Basil
Purple Basil

Eric Brown

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